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Legal Research: A Guide to Administrative Law

Secondary Sources

Secondary resources in the field of law offer analysis, commentary, or a restatement of primary law and are used to help locate and explain primary sources of law. Secondary sources discussing administrative law and subject-specific secondary sources are discussed below. For an introduction to secondary sources (geared toward the beginner legal researcher), use the Law Library of Congress guide, Legal Research: A Guide to Secondary Resources.

The following is a select list of general resources on administrative law available in the Law Library Reading Room (the summaries of the books are supplied by the publisher). The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional digital content are provided when available.

Many subject-specific law treatises (and similar secondary sources) incorporate administrative law and decisions into their commentary or analysis. A few examples of subject-specific treatises that incorporate regulatory law are provided below, for reference. The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional digital content are provided when available.

For more information about finding books and treatises on specific subjects, consult the Law Library's research guide Legal Research: A Guide to Secondary Resources--Books & Binders.

"Services" are somewhat of a hybrid primary-secondary source, wherein case law, administrative law, and commentary are compiled and published together. Services are typically bound in a looseleaf binder to make it easier for the publisher to update the contents (instead of re-publishing a whole book, the publisher can issue updates to just a few pages of information at a time). When a looseleaf grows too big, the publisher may replace the contents with a bound volume or provide a permanent transfer binder. Today, legal researchers still refer to these publications as "looseleafs," even though many long-running looseleaf services are now published exclusively online.

A few examples of looseleaf services available in the Law Library Reading Room are provided below, for reference. The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional digital content are provided when available. To find additional titles, researchers can consult Legal Looseleafs: Electronic and Print (formerly Legal Looseleafs in Print) or the Bluebook (which provides a list of frequently-cited looseleaf services in Table 15).

The following is a select list of administrative law journals available for free on the Internet. Additional journals can be found by searching the Library of Congress Catalog or by using the strategies discussed in Legal Research: A Guide to Secondary Resources--Articles.