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Andrew Jackson: A Resource Guide

Jackson in American Culture

Hugely popular and perennially controversial in his lifetime, Andrew Jackson has loomed larger and longer in public consciousness and national memory than the vast majority of the nation’s leaders, whether heroic generals or powerfully influential presidents—and he was both. The Library of Congress digital collections and resources listed below—as well as others in this guide, such as the Printed Ephemera collection and the Prints & Photographs Online Catalog—document some of the myriad ways in which Jackson has been revered, reviled, and remembered by his fellow Americans.

An American Ballroom Companion

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 to 1938

Cartoon Prints, American

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Early American Sheet Music

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Fiddle Tunes of the Old Frontier: The Henry Reed Collection

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, ca. 1820-1860

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, ca. 1870-1885

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Popular Graphic Arts

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Posters: WPA Posters

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Stereograph Cards

Jackson-related materials in this collection include:

Voices from the Dust Bowl: the Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection, 1940-1941

Washington During the Civil War: The Diary of Horatio Nelson Taft, 1861-1865

Additional Materials

For additional examples of Jackson's place in American culture, go to the Library of Congress Catalog, select the Browse option, change the search box to "SUBJECTS beginning with," and enter the following subject headings:

Click on each heading to see a list of relevant titles, with links to their catalog records. If the item is no longer under copyright, its record may contain a link to an online electronic version.