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A-Z Databases

Includes licensed databases and recommended free resources. To search by subject, use the Library's Electronic Resources Online Catalog.

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The following databases are newly acquired or being evaluated for a future subscription.
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The Archive of Political Emails was established in July 2019. It contains more than 700,000 emails from political candidates, elected officials, PACs, non-profits, NGOs and other entities that shape the political debate. The text of the emails is fully searchable and senders have been organized by:
  • Political party
  • Country
  • State/locality
  • Public office held or sought
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The Best's Library Center provides access to in-depth reports on public and private US, Canadian and Non US insurers, reinsurers, and groups. The Best's Credit Reports feature five years of financial analysis and detailed commentary on a company's operating methods and management philosophy. Access corporate changes that impact existing companies and locate surviving insurers associated with companies no longer in business.
Users will be directed to an acknowledgement page when accessing the resource. Click "I agree" to continue to the content.
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E&P DataBook includes valuable contact information, mechanical specifications, equipment, rates, circulation and much more from thousands of U.S. and Canadian newspaper organizations.
Requires username and password. See reference staff for assistance.
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Established in 1968 by the Spiritual Administration of the Muslims of Central Asia and Kazakhstan, and in continuous publication until its closure in 1991, the journal Muslims of the Soviet East was the only Islamic periodical carrying the official seal of approval of the Soviet government. Published originally in Uzbek, the journal expanded its linguistic base in the following years, adding Arabic (1969), French and English (1974), Farsi (1980), and Dari (1984). A Russian version would come along surprisingly late, only in 1990, one year before its closure. As with many foreign language publications in the Soviet Union, the target audience of the journal were not its citizens but readers abroad. Consequently, the original Uzbek language edition was exclusively in the traditional Arabic script known as the Yana Imla, a disappearing writing form in Soviet Central Asia (due to the aggressive linguistic and educational reforms carried out by the authorities), but in use in Uzbek communities in places like Afghanistan. The choice of the Arabic script had also a secondary strategic significance. Provided the subject matter of the journal - religion, Soviet authorities were especially reluctant to make it available in the reformed Latin alphabet in use in Uzbek schools, thereby precluding, or at least reducing, the likelihood of the journal becoming available to the younger generation, whose anti-religious education was of paramount importance to the government. If the publication of the journal in Arabic, Farsi, and Dari was meant to familiarize readers in those countries with the life of their coreligionists in the Soviet Union, the introduction of the journal in the “Western” languages served an additional propaganda purpose, i.e. to counter the notion prevalent in the West that the USSR was thoroughly and intractably anti-religious. Consisting of multiple sections, the journal contained a mix of sermons exhorting Islamic piety from notable Central Asian clerics, discussions of regional Islamic history, and the role of Soviet Muslims in the cultural and political life of the USSR. The Muslims of the Soviet East Archive contains the most complete collection of the journal in the English language. Fully searchable, the database provides researchers from a variety of disciplines a unique and a valuable insight into the life of Soviet Muslims, journal’s obvious propagandistic slant and purpose notwithstanding.
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The Oxford Research Encyclopedia (ORE) project is one of the most ambitious reference projects that Oxford University Press has embarked upon. OREs are highly discoverable, peer-reviewed, online encyclopedias with essays planned, written, and reviewed by the world’s leading scholars and scientists, providing hundreds of in-depth articles on core topics in all of the major disciplines. Every month, new topics are added and current essays are updated, ensuring that users have the most up-to-date content at their fingertips. The ORE project combines the ease of access and speed of digital publishing with the standards of academic publishing. OREs:
  • Synthesize primary research in high-level interpretive overview articles;
  • Provide anchoring information to be used at the start of a research project;
  • Are developed collaboratively with the global community of experts in a discipline;
  • Are written and vetted by scholars for scholars and students;
  • Direct users to other relevant, trusted content.
Working with international communities of scholars across all fields of study, Oxford has developed new comprehensive collections of in-depth, peer-reviewed summaries on an ever-growing range of topics. While most content is restricted to subscribers, full-text articles of pre-subscription and preview OREs are freely available, as are the summaries in restricted subscriber content.
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Poliarnaia kochegarka (Полярная кочегарка, Polar Furnace, 1934-1988; renamed Shakhter Arktiki [Шахтер Арктики, The Arctic Miner], 1989-1991) was an in-house weekly newspaper published in Barentsburg by the Soviet/Russian state-owned mining trust Arktikugol, which began operating on the Svalbard archipelago in 1931. The constant Soviet/Russian presence in this Norwegian territory was made possible by the so-called Svalbard (Spitsbergen) Treaty, which allows its signatories (currently more than forty countries) to engage freely in economic and research activities on the archipelago. During the Cold War, this led to the curious case of citizens of NATO and Warsaw pact countries coexisting peacefully side by side, with the Iron Curtain partially suspended (if not altogether lifted) in the otherwise potentially volatile and jealously guarded Arctic North.
Arktikugol was established to supply the Russian North with coal from Svalbard to help power the ambitious Soviet industrialization program. Poliarnaia kochegarka was created first and foremost to hold together the Russian-speaking mining community on Svalbard, which at various times was divided among the three Soviet settlements of Barentsburg, Pyramiden and Grumant. The newspaper also served to keep local citizens abreast of the news from the Soviet mainland and the rest of the world, something that used to be out of reach for several months each year (except for radio communication) when ice conditions and polar nights made navigation virtually impossible.
Poliarnaia kochegarka covered numerous topics of interest to its target audience, such as local and world politics and social problems, Svalbard’s history in the context of polar exploration and research, mining history and technology, coal production pledges, health and safety, tertiary education, Arctic tourism, Soviet-Norwegian relations, wildlife, fiction, poetry, memoirs, and more.Among the newspaper’s contributors were both amateur and professional journalists, with early instances of citizen journalism playing a considerable role in the coverage of all sorts of burning issues pertinent to life in the polar regions in general, and Svalbard in particular. As the standard employment contract in the region lasted for two years, it is interesting to observe changes in the newspaper’s style from one editor-in-chief to the next. Among such editors-in-chief were the well-known Erzya author Nikolai Irkaev (1934-1937) and the prominent Murmansk journalist Stanislav Dashchinskii (1967-1969). This digital archive contains the most complete collection available for this title, with over 4,000 issues total of Poliarnaia kochegarka and Shakhter Arktiki (excluding 1941-1947, when the publication was suspended).
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SpringerMaterials provides curated data and advanced functionalities to support research in materials science, physics, chemistry, engineering, and other related fields. Based on the 400-volume Landolt-Börnstein New Series, SpringerMaterials is an extensive collection of fully evaluated physical and chemical property data for engineers and physical scientists. SpringerMaterials includes thermophysical properties of common components and mixtures; a data collection on inorganic solid phases, covering crystallographic data, phase diagrams, diffraction patterns, and physical properties; and a collection of chemical safety documents.
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