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The following databases are newly acquired or being evaluated for a future subscription.
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The Best's Library Center provides access to in-depth reports on public and private US, Canadian and Non US insurers, reinsurers, and groups. The Best's Credit Reports feature five years of financial analysis and detailed commentary on a company's operating methods and management philosophy. Access corporate changes that impact existing companies and locate surviving insurers associated with companies no longer in business.
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E&P DataBook includes valuable contact information, mechanical specifications, equipment, rates, circulation and much more from thousands of U.S. and Canadian newspaper organizations.
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Not long after brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière projected moving pictures on a screen for their fellow Parisians in 1895 cinema became one of the most important and one of the most dominant art forms shaping much of popular culture in the twentieth century. Among the first to recognize the power of cinema both as an art form and as a tool of political propaganda was none other than the leader of the Bolshevik Revolution Vladimir Lenin. His famous quip to the People's Commissar for Education Anatoly Lunacharsky in 1922 that “of all the arts for us cinema is the most important” would go on to become a policy cornerstone resulting in the proliferation of cinema halls throughout the Soviet Union.

The attendance in these halls would remain one of the highest anywhere in the world up until the collapse of the USSR. With masses of captivated and quite literally captive audiences, cinema and the cinematic vocabulary would become weaponized as potent new vehicles of propaganda and messaging, shaping the population’s perception of the social, political, and cultural realities. Virtually every Soviet citizen, regardless of his or her educational background or social status, would be susceptible to the allure of the moving images on the screen.

Aside from the propaganda aspects, early Soviet cinema was truly pioneering, even revolutionary. Some of the most influential film directors and theorists in world cinema operated in the Soviet Union, laying out the foundations of modern cinema and creating some of the most lasting cinematic masterpieces in history. East View’s Early Soviet Cinema Collection contains 116 books published between 1928-1948, the Golden Age of Soviet cinema. They contain works by such renowned film theorists as Lev Kuleshov, Bela Balash, Rudolf Garms, Efraim Lemberg, Natan Zarkhi and others, covering a slew of topics that range from the role of women in cinema to the role of cinema in the creation of a communist society.
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The Oxford Research Encyclopedia (ORE) project is one of the most ambitious reference projects that Oxford University Press has embarked upon. OREs are highly discoverable, peer-reviewed, online encyclopedias with essays planned, written, and reviewed by the world’s leading scholars and scientists, providing hundreds of in-depth articles on core topics in all of the major disciplines. Every month, new topics are added and current essays are updated, ensuring that users have the most up-to-date content at their fingertips. The ORE project combines the ease of access and speed of digital publishing with the standards of academic publishing. OREs:
  • Synthesize primary research in high-level interpretive overview articles;
  • Provide anchoring information to be used at the start of a research project;
  • Are developed collaboratively with the global community of experts in a discipline;
  • Are written and vetted by scholars for scholars and students;
  • Direct users to other relevant, trusted content.
Working with international communities of scholars across all fields of study, Oxford has developed new comprehensive collections of in-depth, peer-reviewed summaries on an ever-growing range of topics. While most content is restricted to subscribers, full-text articles of pre-subscription and preview OREs are freely available, as are the summaries in restricted subscriber content.
Révolution et l'Empire External
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Marked by the Revolution and Empire, the nineteenth century was the century of historians; the methods and schools which today constitute the basis of historical study were developed during this time. This database includes the complete works of the greatest French historians of the nineteenth century, totaling almost 100,000 pages of text. Among the authors included in this database: Aulard, Barante, Louis Blanc, Buchez, Jaurès, Lamartine, Michelet, Quinet, Thiers, and Tocqueville.
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Some of the earliest casualties of revolutions are the ideological and institutional foundations of the political order that legitimated the ancien régime, the old form of government with its established political and socio-economic power relations. Identified by Bolshevik revolutionaries as enablers of centuries-long Tsarist malfeasance, religion and religious institutions were additionally considered to be obstructionists of scientific progress, veritable peddlers of ancient superstitions. Thus, the eradication of religion would be elevated into policy shortly after the 1917 Revolution. Although the destruction of churches, mosques, and synagogues would in practical terms curtail public religiosity, it did not guarantee neither radical nor wholesale change in people’s perceptions of the world in which they lived. The matter of changing people’s worldviews, therefore, was left to propagandists and the radically rethought educational system. The result of these policy and educational changes was the launching of the vicious anti-religious propaganda campaigns of the early 1920s and 1930s, which saw the publication of hundreds of books, newspapers, and popular magazines aimed at the complete ideological overhaul of the USSR. Comprised of nearly 281 books, East View’s Russian Anti-Religious Books After the Revolution Digital Archive is a treasure trove of these early propaganda efforts, containing some of the most important and influential works of anti-religious literature. Full-text searchable and cross-searchable with other e-content from East View the collection is a valuable resource for historians of the Soviet Union, religious studies, and secularization.
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SpringerMaterials provides curated data and advanced functionalities to support research in materials science, physics, chemistry, engineering, and other related fields. Based on the 400-volume Landolt-Börnstein New Series, SpringerMaterials is an extensive collection of fully evaluated physical and chemical property data for engineers and physical scientists. SpringerMaterials includes thermophysical properties of common components and mixtures; a data collection on inorganic solid phases, covering crystallographic data, phase diagrams, diffraction patterns, and physical properties; and a collection of chemical safety documents.
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Part of East View’s Demography and Economy Series, this collection includes 61 statistical publications covering Crimea in Ukraine.
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This varied collection of 150+ books, memoirs, regional guidebooks and more captures a historical period when the definition of “Ukraine” shifted constantly. Competing ideas about Ukraine, Ukrainians, and their future, fueled vibrant debates and violent clashes in the first half of the 20th century. Primarily concentrated between the years 1912 and 1929, the items in this collection illuminate the concerns of intellectuals and politicians during Ukrainians’ early attempts at statehood and initial experience of Sovietization. The first World War irrevocably weakened the Austro-Hungarian and Russian Empires—traditionally the ruling powers in what is now Ukrainian territory. Nationalist, socialist, and anarchist political organizations, who had been growing their numbers since the late 19th century, took this opportunity to fight for their visions of a Ukrainian future.

The dynamic chaos of the Russian Revolution spread to Ukrainian territory, and the Bolsheviks were met with overt supporters, opponents, and temporary allies. Between 1917 and 1921, Ukrainian political activists of various stripes, Bolsheviks, the White Russian Volunteer Army, Polish Republican forces, and members of the Entente and the Allies struggled bitterly to wrest control of the territory. At the end of this conflict, jurisdiction over Ukraine was divided between the Soviet Union, Poland, Romania and Czechoslovakia. The interwar history of Soviet Ukraine is well-represented in this collection. It was a period characterized by an initial policy of korenizatsiia (the promotion of indigenous culture, language, and political elites) that was reversed under Joseph Stalin, leading to the repression of those elements in Ukrainian life.

Published between 1895 and 1957 (with the majority printed between 1900 and 1931), the materials in this collection include history books; polemical essays; tour guides; economic, statistical and infrastructural publications; archival collections; political instruction manuals; memoirs; and works on folk art and daily life (byt). Many books, especially those depicting artwork, are richly illustrated in full color. Most of the materials were published in Ukraine, Russia and the Soviet Union, but a handful of books were printed in important centers of Ukrainian émigré life such as Canada, Germany, France, the U.K. and the U.S. Southern Ukraine and Crimea are the subject of a great number of works, such as travel guides, memoirs and histories of the interwar conflict on that territory, and two unique books: one on the history of Crimean Karaites, and one illustrated children’s book on the everyday life of Crimean Tatars. Jewish people, another important ethnic minority group in Ukrainian history, are represented by several works of historical and personal reflection, such as “The Crimson Book: Pogroms of 1919-1920” by S.I. Gusev-Orenburgskii, published in Harbin, China. The variety of intellectual and political approaches to Ukraine can be seen in the myriad histories and essays in this collection. These include well-established histories by M. Hrushevsky and D. Doroshenko (both are replete with detailed images), anarchist N. Makhno’s memoirs, and memoirs from White Army soldiers. Researchers can find works from Ukrainophile, Russophile, statist, anarchist, conservative, and socialist perspectives. Finally, the effects of Soviet administration are also clearly represented here. One can find statistical and legal records about Ukrainian finances, economics, grain resources, electrification, and agriculture. A few works have a clear ideological impetus: a public lecture on “Red Laws and Red Court,” instructions for conducting revolutionary tribunals, and an essay on W. Ukrainian and W. Belarusian history “for the propagandist/political agitator.”

Exploring this collection would be useful for researchers studying Ukraine’s intellectual history and the interwar period. The collection features a handful of open letters and responses to public intellectuals, charting the discourse at a particular point in time. Personal and military memoirs will be useful for those aiming to understand life and strategy during the tumult of 1917-1921. Researchers interested in economic and commercial history will also find useful materials—tour guidebooks and a volume from the Russian Society of Shipping and Trade (and their advertisements) provide glimpses of leisure and trade in the early 20th century. Scholars of southern Ukraine and Crimea can access a variety of works focused on that region. Finally, those looking for perspectives on Ukraine from outside its borders will find several émigré answers to the central question that occupies so many of these works: where did Ukraine come from, and where is it going?
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The Early Parliamentary Elections that took place in Ukraine in July of 2019 were held not long after the spring presidential elections, which shook up the political scene in Ukraine after the resounding victory of Volodymyr Zelensky, an actor turned politician. The regular Verkhovna Rada elections were scheduled for the fall of 2019, however, immediately following his inauguration, the new president moved to disband the parliament, simultaneously calling for snap elections. The elections were held on July 21, 2019 amid Ukraine’s ongoing conflict with Russia, a stagnating economy, and a burgeoning corruption, - the foremost factors on voters’ minds as they headed to the polls. Nearly all candidates running for Verkhovna Rada promised to address these and similar issues during the election campaign. As a result of the elections, the party of the president Sluha Naroda (Servant of the People) gained 254 seats out of the possible 450, a clear majority.The present database contains ephemera collected and meticulously sorted by East View researchers in Ukraine at the height of the heated Verkhovna Rada election campaign season. Comprised of leaflets, flyers, brochure, newspapers etc., the collection provides scholars of modern Ukrainian politics and democratic transition in Eastern Europe a fully searchable rich array of visual and textual primary sources.
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When the Ukrainian voters went to the polls during the Spring 2019 Presidential Elections, little did they suspect that their votes would become part of American political history, in addition to helping elect a former TV personality to the presidency. The surprising win by the comedian turned politician Volodymyr Zelensky over the incumbent Petro Poroshenko by a landslide, was hailed in the West as a clear manifestation of Ukraine’s democratic credentials and a continuation of the democratic logic behind of the 2014 Revolution of Dignity. Important as Zelensky’s election was for Ukraine’s democratic development, it was soon to be overshadowed by events unfolding in a country located an ocean away, involving the administration of the American president Donald Trump and his reelection bid.

The first round of elections fielded some 39 candidates, the largest group of candidates to ever run for presidency in Ukraine since its independence. The spread of the field and the general competitiveness of the elections guaranteed that none of the candidates would garner the necessary percentage points to win the elections outright. However, even before the results of the elections were announced it was becoming obvious that the main battle for the presidency was to be waged between Zelensky and Poroshenko, who earned 30% and 16% of the votes respectively. The run-off, which took place on April 21, was a three-to-one margin rout of the incumbent, with Zelensky earning 73.19% of the votes to Poroshenko’s 24.48%.

Carefully selected by East View’s researchers and fully searchable, the present database consists of ephemera produced by candidates during the election season. It allows researchers and analysts specializing in Ukraine’s post-Soviet democratic development the opportunity to glean unique insights into the political discourse of a country that finds itself positioned on the frontlines of a new geopolitical rivalry between Russia and the West.
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The 1994 Presidential Elections in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea were the first and last time such elections were held on the peninsula. Controversial at the time, the elections and subsequent political developments laid one of the earliest foundations of the current Russian-Ukrainian political crisis. The elections were held not long after the short-lived declaration of independence in 1992 and the subsequent reconfiguration of the status of Crimea as a constituent entity within Ukraine. The 1994 elections were thus held on the background of simmering tensions between the authorities in Crimea and the government in Kiev, as well as rising tensions between Ukraine and Russia. The elections were won handily by pro-Russian separatist candidate Yuri Meshkov, whose election platform consisted mainly of promises to pursue political and economic integration with Russia.

Following closely on the heels of Yuri Meshkov’s victory on a pro-Russian ticket, were the Supreme Council of Crimea elections of March 27, 1994, held concurrently with the parliamentary elections of Ukraine. As during the presidential elections, majority of voters sided with pro-Russian parties and coalitions, led by Yuri Meshkov’s Bloc Russia, which won 54 seats out of a possible 100. These were also the first parliamentary elections to be held in Crimea since Ukraine’s independence from the Soviet Union.

The current database contains rare election ephemera from the two of the most politically consequential elections in Crimea, setting the future tone of and presaging the coming international crisis 20 years later that resulted in Russia’s annexation of the peninsula from Ukraine. It allows researchers a unique insight into the changing political mood in Crimea as it was happening.
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