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Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations

Past Kissinger Chairs, 2001-2006

Group portrait of diplomats from China with Minister Anson Burlingame and others. 1868. Wood engraving from Harpers New Monthly magazine. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

From 2001-2006, the scholars Aaron L. Friedberg, Klaus Larres, Lanxin Xiang, Melvyn P. Leffler, and James M. Goldgeier individually held the position of Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations.

The research topics that these scholars focused on during their tenure included:

  • European Union and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
  • Policymakers in Washington and Moscow
  • China's democratization
  • American policy-making in Europe and Asia

The sections below provide a brief biography for each scholar and include webcasts of their Library of Congress lectures and programs, as well as selected bibliographies of their print publications.

James M. Goldgeier is professor of international relations at the School of International Service at American University and former senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. At the Kluge Center, Goldgeier examined the growing division between the European Union, NATO, and the former Soviet Union.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As part of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, this event discussed perspectives on the concept of world order from former Kissinger chairs at the Center.

June 12, 2008

The 12-year period between the end of the Cold War and the destruction of the Twin Towers was perceived as calm and peaceful. Yet foreign-policy experts say these were pivotal years in shaping America's role in the world. Derek Chollet and James Goldgeier examined those years in a lecture on their book “America Between the Wars”. According to Chollet and Goldgeier, when the Berlin Wall collapsed on Nov. 9, 1989—signaling the end of the Cold War—America and the West declared victory: democracy and free markets had prevailed and the United States emerged as the world's triumphant superpower. The finger-on-the-button tension that had defined a generation was over, and it seemed that peace was at hand. The next 12 years rolled by in a haze of self-congratulation, what some now call a "holiday from history." When that complacency shattered on September 11, confused Americans asked themselves: how did we get here? Chollet and Goldgeier examined how the decisions and debates of the years between the fall of the Berlin Wall and the terrorist attacks shaped the events, arguments and politics of the world we live in today.

November 15, 2006

James Goldgeier presented a lecture titled "The End of the Cold War and the Struggle Over American Foreign Policy" in a program sponsored by the Kluge Center.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Melvyn P. Leffler is professor of history emeritus at the University of Virginia and a leading authority on modern U.S. foreign relations. At the Kluge Center, Leffler analyzed efforts by policymakers in Washington and Moscow to reduce the confrontational nature of the Cold War.


Featured Video

November 10, 2005

Melvyn P. Leffler presented a lecture titled "Retreat from Armageddon? Khrushchev, Kennedy, Johnson and the Elusive Quest for Peace." According to Leffler, there were many attempts by policymakers in both Washington and Moscow to reduce the confrontational nature of the Cold War. Leffler analyzes the efforts of Nikita Khrushchev, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson and attempt to explain why they did not succeed.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Lanxin Xiang is professor of international history and politics at the Institut Universitaire de Hautes Études Internationales in Geneva, Switzerland. At the Kluge Center, Xiang analyzed the idea of democracy and Sino-U.S. Relations.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As the finale of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, six leading scholars, including Lanxin Xiang, discussed why freedom of expression matters.

 

June 16, 2004

In this lecture Lanxin Xiang argued that in American policy circles the ideological context of Sino-U.S. relations is usually identified as democracy versus communist despotism.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Klaus Larres is professor of history and international affairs at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, NC. At the Kluge Center, Larres researched the United States and the ‘Unity of Europe’: a comparative analysis of American policy-making and European integration in the post-1945 and post-1990 eras.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As part of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, this event discussed perspectives on the concept of world order from former Kissinger chairs at the Center.

 

September 29, 2011

In this video, Klaus Larres discussed how the 1970s, like today, were characterized by controversial military engagements, deep political divisions and severe financial disruptions. Larres describes the Nixon/Kissinger approach to overcoming U.S. "decline" in an increasingly multilateral world and analyzes whether this approach is still relevant for the current administration.

 

May 18, 2010

Two distinguished historians discussed German and American historiography at the Library of Congress. The historians focused on Kocka's contributions to the rise of social history, which became the dominant force in contemporary history on both sides of the Atlantic. Kocka also illuminated the continuing benefits of studying history in the 21st century.

 

May 26, 2005

This event commemorated the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II, focused on an historical perspective of the events surrounding the end of the war and. The panel was moderated by Prosser Gifford, former Director of Scholarly Programs at the Library of Congress. Panelists included Klaus Larres, James Hershberg, Jon Meacham, Elizabeth B. White and Peter Black.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.


Sound Recordings

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information of audio recordings in the Library of Congress Online Catalog.

Aaron L. Friedberg is professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. On April 27, 2001 he was appointed the first Henry Alfred Kissinger Chair. His residence inaugurated the Henry Alfred Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress. At the Kluge Center, Friedberg researched the rise of Asia and its implications for America.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.