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Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations

Past Kissinger Chairs, 2007-2011

James Maxwell Pringle, photographer. Petrograd. From disbound album of James Maxwell Pringle's business trip to Russia and Asia for First National City Bank of New York. Between 1917 and 1918. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

From 2007-2011, the scholars Charles A. Kupchan, Teresita C. Schaffer, C. Raja Mohan, Benjamin Fordham, and W. R. Smyser individually held the position of Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations.

The research topics that these scholars focused on during their tenure included:

  • Global humanitarian matters
  • India’s grand foreign policy strategy
  • Security and risk management trends in Asia
  • The impact of political partisanship on United States engagement in global affairs
  • The influence of economic interests on congressional voting

The sections below provide a brief biography for each scholar and include webcasts of their Library of Congress lectures and programs, as well as selected bibliographies of their print publications.

Teresita C. Schaffer is a former Ambassador and expert on economic, political, security and risk management trends in India and Pakistan, as well as on the region that extends from Afghanistan through Bangladesh. At the Kluge Center, Schaffer researched the evolution of the relationship between India and the United States.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As the finale of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, six leading scholars discussed why freedom of expression matters.

November 13, 2008

The relationship between the United States and India and its likely evolution in the next decade is the topic of a lecture at the Library of Congress by Ambassador Teresita Schaffer. Her lecture is titled "India and the United States: Reinventing Partnership" and she discusses whether the relationship between the United States and India is a "natural alliance" or a marriage of convenience. Schaffer examined whether these two giant democracies can adapt an international partnership to fit their interests, ideals and different foreign policy styles.


Manuscript and Mixed Materials

The following link is an interview with Ambassador Teresita C. Schaffer, part of the Foreign Affairs Oral History Collection of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training, available in the Manuscript Division.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

C. Raja Mohan is professor of South Asian studies at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and leading Indian foreign-policy analyst. At the Kluge Center, Mohan researched the evolution of India’s grand foreign policy strategy and its growing security cooperation with the United States.


Featured Video

February 22, 2010

As China and India emerge as great powers, they are beginning to transform the maritime security politics in the Western Pacific and Indian oceans. A panel discussion examined the naval dynamic among China, India, and the United States and the implications for the maritime balance of power in Asia.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Charles A. Kupchan is professor of international affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. At the Kluge Center, Kupchan examined the impact of political partisanship on United States engagement in global affairs.


Featured Videos

January 16, 2019

This discussion explored the legacies of a pivotal period in world history—during and after the Paris Peace Conference, which ended World War I—including themes of Wilsonianism, the ideological origins of the United Nations, the projection of American power and a new international order.

September 23, 2012

Charles Kupchan appeared at the 2012 Library of Congress National Book Festival.

September 20, 2007

Americans are living in an era marked by political partisanship and polarization. What happened to the bipartisanship of previous decades, and how does this political climate affect U.S. engagement in global affairs? In his lecture, Charles Kupchan drew on an article, co-authored with Peter Trubowitz, titled "Dead Center: The Demise of Liberal Internationalism in the United States," which appears in the fall issue of International Security, a quarterly journal produced by Harvard University's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Benjamin Fordham is a professor and chair of Binghamton University’s Political Science Department. Fordham has published numerous articles on the role of domestic economic performance in decisions to use military force abroad, the effect of party differences on policy choices about the use of force and the allocation of the military budget in the United States, and on the influence of economic interests on congressional voting on foreign economic and security policy matters. At the Kluge Center, Fordham researched ways that domestic, political and economic considerations influence foreign-policy decisions, especially as they relate to the rise of the United States as a world power.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As part of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, this event discussed perspectives on the concept of world order from former Kissinger chairs at the Center.

 

March 17, 2011

Benjamin Fordham discussed the emergence of the United States as a world power during the years prior to World War I.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

W. R. Smyser was a historian of modern Germany who also served as a Foreign Service officer, member of Henry Kissinger's National Security Council staff and deputy high commissioner for refugees at the United Nations. Smyser, was an expert on the economy and politics of Europe and on global humanitarian matters. At the Kluge Center, Smyser conducted research on diplomacy.


Featured Video

October 23, 2008

Does the U.S., as a longstanding superpower, need a diplomatic strategy to protect and advance our interests in the new world? William R. Smyser examined the topic in a lecture at the Library of Congress.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.