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Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations

Past Kissinger Chairs, 2012-2016

Toni Frissell, photographer. People and wreckage of buildings after a bombing raid of London during World War II.1945. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

From 2012-2016, the scholars Bruce W. Jentleson, Bradford Lee, John Bew, William I. Hitchcock, and Alexander Evans individually held the position of Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations.

The research topics that these scholars focused on during their tenure included:

  • Pakistan’s strategic culture and its influence
  • Post-World War II era
  • American military interventions
  • 20th-century world leaders for global peace and security

The sections below provide a brief biography for each scholar and include webcasts of their Library of Congress lectures and programs, as well as selected bibliographies of their print publications.

Bruce W. Jentleson is an accomplished American foreign policy scholar, former senior advisor at the U.S. Department of State, and professor at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. At the Kluge Center he worked on his book, “Transformational Statesmanship: Difficult, Possible, Necessary,” which examines 20th century world leaders who made major breakthroughs for global peace and security.


Featured Videos

May 22, 2018

Bruce Jentleson discussed his book “The Peacemakers”, which he researched while he was in residence at the Kluge Center. The book explores how a variety of 20th-century leaders rewrote the scripts they were handed to make breakthroughs on issues long thought intractable.

May 19, 2016

Bruce Jentleson looked across five dimensions of global peace and security: major power geopolitics, building international institutions, fostering reconciliation of peoples, advancing freedom and human rights, and promoting sustainability. Jentleson structured the profiles of leaders in a Who-Why-How-What framework to both gain better understanding of key 20th century events and draw lessons for 21st century challenges. Who were the 20th century world leaders who forged transformational breakthroughs in global peace and security? Why did they make the crucial choices that they did? How did they pursue their goals? What are the lessons for the 21st century global agenda?

June 11, 2015

As part of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, this event discussed perspectives on notions of morality.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Bradford Lee is an accomplished scholar of foreign policy, military strategy, and international relations. Lee is Emeritus Philip A. Crowl professor of comparative strategy at the U.S. Naval War College. At the Kluge Center, Lee worked on a book project that examined the results and costs of American military intervention in the 20th century.


Featured Video

May 07, 2015

Bradford Lee performed a critical analysis of how the U.S. waged war and negotiated peace from 1917 to 1919, and considered whether the value of victory was worth the costs of achieving it.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

John Bew is professor of history and foreign policy at the War Studies Department at King’s College in London, where he leads a major project called the Grand Strategy Programme with the aim of bringing more historical and strategic expertise to statecraft, diplomacy and foreign policy. Bew is currently a member of the Number 10 Policy Unit, an elite group that provides policy advice directly to the British Prime Minister. At the Kluge Center, Bew’s research focused on realpolitik in Anglo-American political culture.


Featured Videos

April 10, 2014

John Bew argued that real realpolitik is ripe for excavation and rediscovery as it undergoes a renaissance in the English-speaking world. He contended that the original concept of 'realpolitik' is still relevant to the challenges of the 21st century and that its use in the English language provides a window into the soul of Anglo-American political culture.

 

March 27, 2014

Robert Kagan and John Bew discussed how America positions itself in the world in the 21st-century.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

William I. Hitchcock is a professor of history at the University of Virginia and a senior scholar at the Miller Center for Public Policy. Hitchcock has written widely on Cold War trans-Atlantic relations and European international affairs in the post-World War II era. At the Kluge Center, he performed research for his book “The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s”.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As part of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, this event discussed how we write about those who came before us.


Print Materials

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are provided when available.

Alexander Evans is a member of the British diplomatic service and a visiting senior research fellow in War Studies at King's College in London. Evans was also former senior adviser to the late Ambassador Richard Holbrooke and then to Ambassador Marc Grossman, and the U.S. special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan. He has published widely on South Asia, international security and the nature of policy advice. At the Kluge Center, he researched Pakistan’s strategic culture and its influence on U.S. foreign policy goals.


Featured Videos

June 11, 2015

As part of a two-day celebration of the 15th anniversary of the Kluge Center, this event discussed perspectives on the concept of world order with former Kissinger chairs at the Center.

 

December 1, 2011

How is diplomacy changing? What can diplomats do to prevent or resolve conflict, initiate or manage change? These questions were addressed by a distinguished group of diplomats and scholars.

 

November 17, 2011

Drawing on archival research, Alexander Evans discussed how Pakistan understands its strategic interests and what this means for U.S.-Pakistan relations.