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Latinx Studies: Library of Congress Resources

This guide provides curated Library of Congress resources for researching LatinX Studies, including digitized primary source materials in a wide variety of formats, books and periodicals, online databases, and research strategies.

Introduction

The Library of Congress has a wide variety of primary and secondary sources useful in the study of the the Latinx history and experience. Through this guide, the curators and librarians in the Library's Hispanic Division have identified the most useful resources and have recommended strategies for expanding your research on this topic. You will find links to digitized primary sources through a curated list of collections based on format, databases to locate journals or scholarly articles, and a print bibliography and additional subject searches into the Library of Congress Online Catalog.

Have you heard of the term Latinx?

"Latinx intends to describe the in-between space in which Latinx live, which allows us to cross racial boundaries more easily and construct identities, or self-images, that include a wide variety of racial, national, and even gender-based identification."

—Ed Morales
Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture

Latinx is a gender-neutral term that has gained popularity in recent years as an alternative to the gendered forms of Latina, Latino, or even Latin@. The Library of Congress actively collects materials in various formats that document the history and culture of the US Latina(o)/Latinx community.

What do you think of this term? Is it an appropriate, more inclusive term to describe a complex and multi-cultural community? Or do you find it difficult to use and include it in context? Let us know what you think by submitting a message through Ask a Librarian.

About the Hispanic Division

The reading room of the Hispanic Division is the primary access point for research related to the Caribbean, Latin America, Spain and Portugal; the indigenous cultures of those areas; and peoples throughout the world historically influenced by Luso-Hispanic heritage, including Latinos in the U.S. and peoples of Portuguese or Spanish heritage in Africa, Asia, and Oceania.