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Louis Moreau Gottschalk: A Guide to Resources

Starting Your Research

The following resources related to the life and work of Louis Moreau Gottschalk are an excellent place to begin your research. Some materials are available electronically, and others are primarily in print. Links to electronic versions of articles and dissertations may be available only via a subscription database, indicated with a padlock icon. 

Blog Posts, Articles and Related Guides

The following links lead to blog posts and articles written by Library of Congress subject specialists, as well as related research guides.

Primary Sources at the Library of Congress

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are included when available.

  • "La jota Aragonesa, caprice espangol," holograph manuscript, ML96.G635 (Case) (no online catalog record)
  • "Jerusalem: Grande fantaisie triomphale," holograph manuscript, ML96.G635 (Case)
  • "Marche de la nuit," copy of the holograph manuscript of Gottschalk's piano piece arranged for band by John Philip Sousa, ML96.5.S733 (Case)

Selected Articles from Chronicling America

The links below provide access to a sampling of articles from historic newspapers that can be found in Chronicling America. You can further explore the topic of "Louis Moreau Gottschalk" using the following search strategies:

  • Use the following terms in combination, proximity, or as a phrase: Louis Gottschalk, Louis M. Gottschalk, Louis Moreau Gottschalk
  • It is important to use a specific date range if looking for articles for a particular event in order to narrow your results. To narrow your results to articles published during his lifetime, search between 1829 and 1869.

Selected Bibliography

The following titles link to fuller bibliographic information in the Library of Congress Online Catalog. Links to additional online content are included when available.

Subscription Databases

The subscription resources marked with a padlock are available to researchers on-site at the Library of Congress. If you are unable to visit the Library, you may be able to access these resources through your local public or academic library.