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New York World-Telegram & Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection at the Library of Congress

This guide provides an overview of the Prints & Photographs Division collection of approximately 1 million published and unpublished images taken chiefly from 1920-1967, highlighting subject strengths and search techniques.

Introduction

Ed Ford, photographer. Hulan Jack holding a photograph of Joseph Pulitzer....1956. Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

The New York World-Telegram & Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection consists of an estimated 1 million black and white photographs, most from the 1920’s to 1967, the year that the New York World Journal Tribune closed. In 1967, the collection was donated to the Library by the N.Y. World Journal Tribune.

From 1860-1931, the New York World was published daily. In 1931, the World merged with the New York Telegram to become the New York World-Telegram. In 1950, the paper became the New York World-Telegram & Sun with the acquisition of the New York Sun. In 1966, the World-Telegram & Sun ceased publication and became a component of the short-lived New York World Journal Tribune.

No original negatives are included in the collection. This newspaper photo morgue is typical of the files that newspapers maintained of images that either were published or were thought to have future publication potential.

The collection is divided in two parts: 1) a biographical file which contains portraits and other images related to specific people, and 2) a subject/geographical file which contains images related to topical subjects and places.

Some images were taken by the newspaper’s staff photographers while others came from wire press services. Among the staff photographers were Walter Albertin, Al Aumuller, Dick DeMarsico, Orlando Fernandez, Ed Ford, Roger Higgins, Herman Hiller, Fred Palumbo, Al Ravenna, Phil Stanziola, Phyllis Twachtman, and Stanley Wolfson. Others are publicity photos from television networks, film studios and the like. Many images have been cropped, retouched, or highlighted for publication.