Skip to Main Content

Rachel Carson: A Resource Guide

American marine biologist, author, and conservationist, Rachel Carson (1907-1964), advanced the modern environmental movement through her work and writings. This guide lists suggested resources for researching Rachel Carson and her influence.

Introduction

Associated Press. Rachel Carson, half-length portrait, standing, facing front, holding her book, Silent Spring. 1963. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The impact of Rachel Carson’s seminal book Silent Spring (1962) is still felt today as our awareness of environmental contaminants continues to grow. Her pioneering studies led to the national ban on Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, better known as DDT. This widely used pesticide caused the weakening of the shells of the eggs of many breeds of birds and led to a massive decline in birthrate across bird species, including the near extinction of the Bald Eagle. By bringing this research development to the scientific community in time, Rachel Carson was able to help many of the affected species to make substantial recoveries.

The original bibliography was created on May 27, 2007, in observance of the 100th anniversary of Rachel Carson's birth, to highlight the books and articles by and about Carson available at the Library of Congress.

This new research guide is a continuation of the original list, adding new book titles and resources that have been published since 2007.

Featured Webcast

Andrea Barnet discusses her book "Visionary Women: How Rachel Carson, Jane Jacobs, Jane Goodall and Alice Waters Changed Our World," along with other authors ins this program at the 2019 Library of Congress National Book Festival in Washington, D.C.